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About Digital Art / Professional Jon NeimeisterMale/United States Recent Activity
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Andantonius
Jon Neimeister
Artist | Professional | Digital Art
United States
Frequently Asked Questions

Do you take commissions?
Occasionally, but only in small batches. Be sure to +Watch me if you're interested, I always post a deviation with information whenever I open up a batch of commissions! :)

Do you take requests?
Unfortunately not, client work eats up most of my days and time outside of that is for personal work and study.

How did you learn to draw?
In a word: practice. I did go to art school and I learned a lot of useful stuff there, but art school isn't a necessity and anyone can learn to draw if you're willing to invest a lot of time and practice diligently.

How do you get your paintings so clean?
In a word: patience. I spend easily 30+ hours painting a single character, going in and making sure everything that needs to be clean is clean, and everything that's rough is intentionally rough. For more specifics on my process, check out the Tutorials & Resources folder in my gallery.

Can I use your art for my project?
It depends, if it's just for you and just for fun like a D&D campaign with your friends I don't mind, but for any projects / content that involve any kind of profit or advertising of another product or website you will need to get my permission first. If in doubt, please ask first.

Activity


Arachne by Andantonius
Arachne
Smite's Grim Weaver patch notes just revealed Arachne's remodel! I got to paint her default card which was incredibly fun, she's definitely one of my favorite gods and I love her new design. :D

© Hi-Rez Studios
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Rakshasa Vamana by Andantonius
Rakshasa Vamana
New Smite card revealed in today's patch notes! Really enjoyed painting the super cold color palette, and had some fun experimenting with color jitter brushes too. :)

© Hi-Rez Studios
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People don't listen to classical music as much as they used to. Many would define it as slow or boring, and in comparison with the fast paced, drum driven, digital glitching music of today they're not wrong to feel it that way.

This is true in every form of media. Why play a board game when you can play a video game with exciting graphics and sound? Why watch a stage play when you can watch a movie with impossible action and breathtaking visuals? Why read an article when you can watch a YouTube vlog with jump cuts mid-sentence ensuring none of your precious time is wasted?

This is the evolution of media and technology and it's not inherently bad, in many ways it's incredibly good. New media offers all kinds of great things that shouldn't be discounted, but it also comes with a risk. We get used to the idea that we need to be perpetually entertained, every second of every day. When we're used to being constantly stimulated by new #content, how can we ever expect to sit down for 8 hours and finish a great painting? How can spending 30 minutes rendering someone's left forearm compete with the thrill of an action movie?

It can't. And it shouldn't have to.

Much like classical music or a stage play, making artwork is a slow process. It requires patience, focus, and a lot... of..... time. And for most of us that requires some proactive conditioning of our brain. Now don't worry, I'm not saying you should cancel your internet and only listen to Mozart for the rest of your life, but if you struggle with focus, I would highly recommend committing to this rule:
Before and during work hours, avoid highly stimulating media.

Now i'm no brain science man, but this is something I've learned from my mentors and have found to be very true in my own work. If I play video games in the morning before painting, I can't focus. If I try to watch movies on the side during the long process of rendering, I can't focus. If my phone is buzzing with new emails and tweets to check every 5 minutes, I can't focus. As a result of this cumulative effect, I've spent many 10 hour days and accomplished only 2 hours of work.

Without exception, I have always made my best work in the shortest amount of time when I commit myself to focus. I still watch plenty of movies and play plenty of games, but only after I finish my art for the day. Our perception is heavily influenced by contrast, and if you don't overstimulate your mind in the morning it's much, MUCH, easier to focus on the slow process of painting throughout the day. If the most thrilling thing you've done today is brush your teeth, making art actually becomes pretty exciting.

So if you find yourself struggling with focus I'd encourage you to give this a try! No games, movies, TV, etc. before or during work hours. Keep your phone in another room where you can't hear it. Avoid constantly updating sites like Twitter, Facebook, and Tumblr like the plague. Then when you've put in your honest work for the day, go wild and have a good time. I think you'll find that you can make better art in less time, and enjoy the process much more.

Until next time, make art and f-f-focus on it! :)
People don't listen to classical music as much as they used to. Many would define it as slow or boring, and in comparison with the fast paced, drum driven, digital glitching music of today they're not wrong to feel it that way.

This is true in every form of media. Why play a board game when you can play a video game with exciting graphics and sound? Why watch a stage play when you can watch a movie with impossible action and breathtaking visuals? Why read an article when you can watch a YouTube vlog with jump cuts mid-sentence ensuring none of your precious time is wasted?

This is the evolution of media and technology and it's not inherently bad, in many ways it's incredibly good. New media offers all kinds of great things that shouldn't be discounted, but it also comes with a risk. We get used to the idea that we need to be perpetually entertained, every second of every day. When we're used to being constantly stimulated by new #content, how can we ever expect to sit down for 8 hours and finish a great painting? How can spending 30 minutes rendering someone's left forearm compete with the thrill of an action movie?

It can't. And it shouldn't have to.

Much like classical music or a stage play, making artwork is a slow process. It requires patience, focus, and a lot... of..... time. And for most of us that requires some proactive conditioning of our brain. Now don't worry, I'm not saying you should cancel your internet and only listen to Mozart for the rest of your life, but if you struggle with focus, I would highly recommend committing to this rule:
Before and during work hours, avoid highly stimulating media.

Now i'm no brain science man, but this is something I've learned from my mentors and have found to be very true in my own work. If I play video games in the morning before painting, I can't focus. If I try to watch movies on the side during the long process of rendering, I can't focus. If my phone is buzzing with new emails and tweets to check every 5 minutes, I can't focus. As a result of this cumulative effect, I've spent many 10 hour days and accomplished only 2 hours of work.

Without exception, I have always made my best work in the shortest amount of time when I commit myself to focus. I still watch plenty of movies and play plenty of games, but only after I finish my art for the day. Our perception is heavily influenced by contrast, and if you don't overstimulate your mind in the morning it's much, MUCH, easier to focus on the slow process of painting throughout the day. If the most thrilling thing you've done today is brush your teeth, making art actually becomes pretty exciting.

So if you find yourself struggling with focus I'd encourage you to give this a try! No games, movies, TV, etc. before or during work hours. Keep your phone in another room where you can't hear it. Avoid constantly updating sites like Twitter, Facebook, and Tumblr like the plague. Then when you've put in your honest work for the day, go wild and have a good time. I think you'll find that you can make better art in less time, and enjoy the process much more.

Until next time, make art and f-f-focus on it! :)

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Comments


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:iconk-art-b:
k-ART-b Featured By Owner Apr 20, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Your work is beautiful and your progress pic is inspirational. Thank you for sharing your talent with the world.
Reply
(1 Reply)
:iconsol-caninus:
Sol-Caninus Featured By Owner Apr 13, 2016   General Artist
A question for you about how to use the Zorn palette.  Do you actually lay it out as you did in the demo, and use that to choose and mix, or is it something you keep in your head for reference when you use the color picker?  

Any recommended reading, demos or tutorials for getting control of color? 
Reply
(1 Reply)
:iconbysqueesh:
BySqueesh Featured By Owner Mar 27, 2016   Digital Artist
Great work, follow from me :)
Reply
:iconhermidraws:
Hermidraws Featured By Owner Mar 24, 2016  Hobbyist
Hey Andantonius I noticed you create music. What software you can recommend for someone wanting to explore that area (just starting out) I am really amazed by music, so having some sort of digital software for making music is great and I also like your musics.

I think exploring music can also aid with coming up with better ideas I feel. 
Reply
(1 Reply)
:iconchristai:
Christai Featured By Owner Feb 21, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
Panda Emoji-31 (Hello) [V2] How you doin'?
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